ways to dress your windows

February 22, 2012

Have you ever wondered how you can dress your large, two-story windows? There are a couple different ways to do it. We have seen our share of window challenges over the past 10 years…

Here are some of the solutions we have come up with…

These tall windows are dressed with flowy sheer panels. We added a detail of shell trim towards the top to bring your eye up. The family wanted privacy but wanted light to still be able to filter through so we selected this subtle striped trevira sheer - it's beautiful AND durable to stand the beating sun.

This large two story hearth room needed some privacy and sophistication. We designed silk panels that open in the center, so the clients can take advantage of the great views. By bringing the panels down to the second tier of windows it makes the room seem more cozy. Since the fabric is silk, we had the panels interlined so the silk fibers will be protected.

In this large two story living room, the client wanted a way to soften the windows and still have privacy. We designed and installed four stationary panels on a long rod along with some honeycomb Hunter Douglas shades. By mounting the rod under the 1st set of windows, we brought the visual ceiling of the space down to make the tall space seem more cozy. The stationary panels feature an exotic pattern to bring in some attitude.

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kitchen design solutions

January 25, 2012

Here is a snippet of one of our kitchen remodel projects. Our clients came to us to re-work their kitchen after we worked on their master suite a while back. They had moved into this parade home in the 90s and were in need of some updating.

Below you’ll see the before and after pictures and our problems and design solutions.

Before: The white kitchen needed some changes and updates.

a. problem: The clients were tired of their white cabinets and wanted something new. The existing cabinets weren’t constructed very well and didn’t seem to function the way that they needed them to. solution: We designed new cabinets and stained them espresso and outfitted them with pretty french brass hardware.

b. problem: The existing granite and cook top were still in great shape and the clients wanted to keep them. solution: We kept the floor plan the same to accommodate for the existing granite. The cook top stayed in the same place as well.

c. problem: The upper cabinets were only 15″ off of the counter top and this made working under the cabinets hard. solution: Since we raised the cabinets up to 18″ off the counter we selected new back splash tile. Now the counter top can be used to it’s full potential.

d. problem:  the microwave was only 14″ from the cook top so cooking in a tall stock pot was out of the question – it simply didn’t fit! solution: We relocated the microwave and designed a custom hood for proper space above the cooktop and the right ventilation.

e. problem: The current set up didn’t allow for adequate ventilation for the gas cook top. solution: The newly designed hood works great for venting and aesthetically fits into the new cabinetry since we framed it in the same wood as the cabinets.

f. problem: The glass cabinets made the existing kitchen feel too busy. solution: We designed paneled doors for most of the upper cabinets to create a more cohesive, clean feel.

g. problem: Once we took the microwave out from above the cook top, it needed a home out of the sight line. solution: We placed a new drawer microwave in the base cabinet to the right of the cook top to keep it in the work triangle, but to keep it out of the sight line.

h. problem: We felt that the base cabinets needed some details. solution: We added legs to the cooktop cabinet and the left and right of the sink. This breaks up the long, linear lines of the base cabinets and adds a custom feel to the new kitchen.

After: Once we studied the kitchen and came up with a list of problems, we designed solutions to make the kitchen more efficient and functional.

kitchen organization

January 11, 2012

One of your New Year’s Resolutions might be to get more organized. It seems we all say this at least once a year… “if only I was more organized then…”

Well we’re going to show you an example of a hauthaus kitchen design and organization notes. Below you can see a floor plan of a kitchen; we met withe client and used our imagination to ‘take out’ all of the pieces in her current kitchen and ‘put them away’ into her new kitchen. We wanted to make sure that the new kitchen will be well organized and that it will work for her and how she specifically uses her kitchen.

A few notes about the plan:

  • You can see that we kept a large storage space for her kids’ school stuff; papers, lunch bags, supplies, etc. They are stored away in baskets on adjustable shelves. Each kid has their own basket.
  • The Wolf range is located on the center of the left wall. Since the client is right handed, we put her cooking utensils and spices on the right. The upper cabinets to the left of the range are hinged so that you can access them both from the range without having to maneuver around open doors.
  • We designed a specific spot for the KitchenAid mixer to always sit on the counter. The upper corner cabinet will continue all the way down to the counter top and act as a mixer ‘garage’. Her baking utensils and mixing bowls are located in that corner as well on the lazy susan.
  • There is a designated breakfast prep spot on the right side of the kitchen. This will allow the kids to make their own breakfast while staying out of the kitchen work triangle (the space between the sink, range and fridge).

Here is a drawing of the wall with the range; you can see how we called out where the pieces will be ‘put away’.

Will you be re-designing your kitchen in 2012? If so, hauthaus can help! Give us a ring!

resolutions: for your home

January 3, 2012

This time of year nearly everyone is thinking about how they can make 2012 better than 2011.  Some people join a gym or commit to a new exercise routine, they vow to eat healthier and make more ‘me’ time. Some people say they will get around to all of the household projects that were on last year’s list.

Well here are some suggestions for resolutions your can make for your home:

  1. Get Organized! Stores are going to have all of their organizing bins, baskets, and boxes on sale or clearance now thru the next two weeks. Be sure to grab up a bunch and organize a closet or storage room. Having a rhyme and reason to your storage spaces really helps put your mind at ease… and not to mention, it’s great to know exactly where to look when you’re trying to find something!
  2. Save on energy bills.  Now is a great time to switch out your bulbs for energy-savers, turn down your water heater a degree or two, and program your thermostat. These little changes don’t seem like much, but over time, they are a great way to save a little green!
  3. Clear out the clutter.  Set aside an afternoon and sort through your clutter. There are lots of places around the Twin Cities that accept donations; Bridging can pick up your donations, while  Goodwill locations, Arc Value Village locations, The Reuse Center all accept drop offs. Clear out your cabinets and closets and help make a difference to someone less fortunate!
  4. Refresh your linens. New sheets and towels make a world of difference. After you donate or recycle your gently used items, stock up on new linens. A crisp set of white sheets and some fluffy towels might be all your bedroom and bathroom needs to feel refreshed!
  5. Get out your paint brush. New color on the walls breathes new life into a space. Color theory is an interesting thing – you can control the feel and energy of the room just by the color on the walls.

What other resolutions are on your list for 2012?

When it comes down to all of the nitty-gritty details in your home during a remodel or if your building new, it’s great to have a qualified interior designer in your back pocket to study and go over all of these details both large and small.

For example… did you know that when installing a fireplace there are lots of dimensions, tolerances, and rules of what can go where?

One reason to hire an interior designer: there are LOTS of details that go into a home project!

 
 
This is just ONE page  from ONE of our graphic standards and interior codes books that has 550+ pages in it!
 
Now that’s a lot of details to go over!!!

One way to tackle the storage space beneath your bathroom or kitchen sink is to put in a bank of drawers. Drawers are one way to ensure that you’re using every inch of cabinet space since you can pull them all the way out (with the help of full-extension glides) and get to the very back and bottom of the cabinet.

In this bathroom, we designed a bank of drawers under this sink. The top ‘drawer’ is false, while the second one is cut in a U shape to accommodate the plumbing. The bottom drawer is full-sized with a notch cut out of the very back, and it’s deep enough to store toilet paper, bottles of shampoo standing up, bathroom cleaners and other toiletries.

If installing a drawer under a sink, make sure that it is U-shaped to accomodate the plumbing.

 
 
 

a look at in floor heat

October 18, 2011

We recently had one of our clients install in floor heat in their master bathroom and sun porch. If you’re considering this method of heating, here are some points to consider.

Pros:

  1. Consistent heat – this way of heating helps there to be less hot and cool pockets in your space and offers a more consistent heat throughout the space.
  2. It’s quieter than a traditional furnace.
  3. While it costs more to install upfront, it saves money in the long run because your thermostat can stay regulated easier.
  4. You can set it on a timer, so it’s only on when you’re using the room. (You can set it so the bathroom is nice and toasty warm on those cold winter mornings!)
  5. This type of system works well with solar-powered sources.
  6. It is recommended for those with allergies because, unlike a forced air unit, there aren’t lots of allergens floating around from room to room

Cons:

  1. It is more costly upfront to install because it should be installed by a professional who knows what they are doing to make sure it will work correctly.

You should take into consideration what material you will cover it with. The thickness and type of flooring will determine how much of the heat will enter the room.

 In floor heat can be installed anywhere – even under a wood floor if it’s properly installed!

This master bath shot was taken right after the in floor heat was installed. Now it's just waiting for marble tile!

 

In floor heat installed under hardwood flooring in a lakeshore home.